FAQ



Where do I park?
What side of Whyte Ave. are you on?
What does insurance cover at your clinic?
Do you provide routine veterinary care?
How long have you been here in Edmonton?
How long has each vet been with you? How long have they been practicing?
Where do you get your herbs from?
What are the benefits of a raw or home-cooked diet?
How do I administer homeopathic remedies?
Do herbs have side effects?
How do I give herbs to my pet?
How important are clean teeth to a dog or cat?
What can you do at home for your pet’s teeth?

Where do I park?

There is free one hour parking outside our clinic on 102 Street. Ample unlimited parking is available one block north on 83rd avenue. A few stalls are also available in the alley behind the veterinary clinic.

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What side of Whyte Ave. are you on?

We are on the north side of Whyte Ave. and on the east side of 102nd St., facing west. The clinic is just east of where the train tracks cross Whyte Ave., across 102nd St. from the Sun Toyota used car lot.

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What does insurance cover at your clinic?

In general, most plans cover all our products and services. Examples include exams, drugs and natural medicines with a DIN number, acupuncture and chiropractic treatments, and laboratory testing. What exactly is covered depends on your specific provider and plan. For more details, contact your provider.

Once you’ve paid for your visit, we provide you with a receipt you can submit to your insurance company for the appropriate refund.

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Do you provide routine veterinary care?

Yes, we provide routine veterinary care as well, including vaccines, annual exams, spays, neuters and dentistry. We’re experts at doing these tasks in as gentle a manner as possible

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How long have you been here in Edmonton?

We opened in June 2001 and just celebrated our tenth anniversary. Dr. Steve Marsden was also the founder of Terwillegar Veterinary Clinic in 1989.

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How long has each vet been with you? How long have they been practicing?

Drs. Kären and Steve Marsden founded and own the clinic. Dr. Kären has been practising for 12 years and Dr. Steve has been practising for 23 years, with about 20 years of experience practising holistic medicine. He is one of the pioneers of this field of medicine.

Dr. Jennifer Marshall moved to Canada from the US to join our practice in 2008. She Graduated from Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2004.

Dr. Gina McLachlan has been with the clinic since 2009 and has been practicing veterinary medicine for over 12 years.

Dr. Tracey Henderson joined our practice this year. She has been practicing for 15 years.

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Where do you get your herbs from?

Our Chinese herbs are grown under stringent GMP-certified conditions in special plantations all over China. They are CFIA and FDA approved, organically grown and free of heavy metals and pesticides.

Our western herbs are sourced from a prominent GMP certified manufacturer in British Columbia.

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What are the benefits of a raw or home-cooked diet?

Visit our Whole Foods Approachpage for a detailed discussion of home-cooked and raw diets and their benefits.

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How do I administer homeopathic remedies?

The labels of most homeopathic remedies say not to touch them with your fingers. The reality is that they are safe to touch and can simply be tucked into food. Animals usually have no objections to their sweet taste.

If an animal is not eating, or refuses homeopathic remedies in their food try the following:
1. Place about six pellets on a large spoon, and fit another spoon over top. Slowly and firmly grind the spoons together to crush the pellets. You’ll lose some, but enough should be left on the spoon to make up a dose
2. Loosen the powder so it will flow freely. Then either dump it on their tongue or sprinkle it into the side of their mouth or onto their lower lip.

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Do herbs have side effects?

Surveys consistently show that side effects are much less common and less severe than side effects from drugs. Generally, they are restricted to fatigue, loss of appetite, occasional vomiting or loose stools. The vast majority of our patients don’t experience even these symptoms since our herbs are extremely high quality an since we take the time to perfectly match each treatment to the patient.

Nevertheless, if you feel your pet is experiencing side effects from their herbs, follow these three steps:

1. Stop administering the herb and see if the symptom goes away within 24 hours. If not, the problem is not the herbal medicine, and we should see your pet again.
2. If the symptom disappears, re-start the herbs at a low dose and work your way slowly back up to the normal dose over several days. With the right herbal formula, even a low dose will benefit some pets.
3. If the symptom re-appears, the formula has uncovered a latent problem that should be addressed. Please call us. We may need to see your pet again.

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How do I give herbs to my pet?

Most animals will accept herbs in their food. Doses used are usually relatively small, allowing them to be easily disguised in strong tasting canned foods or fish, or even occasionally sprinkled on kibble. Often the right herb for a patient will be palatable to them, even if it’s not to us.

For stronger tasting herbs that are not as easy to disguise, try:

  • Mixing them in some broth and then either pour them onto food or give them by syringe, followed by a ‘treat’ chaser
  • Fold them into a small amount of sardines, maple syrup, yogurt, ice cream, processed cheese, cream cheese, peanut butter, liverwurst, pate, or apple sauce
  • hiding them inside Pill Pockets, an inexpensive hollow treat available from our clinic.

To prevent your pet chewing too long on a medicated treat, have a second treat at the ready. When a dog sees more than one treat lined up for them, they will swallow the first one quickly to get at the second.

Some animals will accept medication easily in pill form. If we’ve dispensed them as a powder, you can turn them into a pill by putting them into one of three different  sizes of gel caps that we have in stock. Liquid herbs can also be put in gel caps but should be used as soon as you’ve made them or the capsule will dissolve.

Simple devices (e.g. Cap M Qwik) costing about $20 are widely available that can fill 30 to 60 medium-sized gelatin capsules at a time. Alternatively, many human pharmacies will put the herbs into gel caps for a fee.

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How important are clean teeth to a dog or cat?

Very! Bad teeth or gums can do more than cause bad breath – they’re painful, and can really bring an animal down. Poor oral health can even result in behavioral changes including less interest playing, the outdoors and going for walks. Getting your pet’s teeth professionally cleaned and having any problem teeth removed can put the spring back in your pet’s step.

How do you know if your pet’s teeth need professional attention? Lift up their lips and have a look at their gums and teeth. If their gums look red or swollen, they might have gingivitis or stomatitis. If any teeth look brown or black, they probably have tartar, and may even be dead. For everything you can see, know that there is at least that much in damage that you can’t see. So check those choppers regularly, and make sure you get an exam if you’re in doubt. Checking teeth is something we do regularly in every annual or routine exam.

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What can I do at home for my pet’s teeth?

The first thing to do is feed them properly. Raw diets support dental health by greatly reducing the amount of plaque and tartar that develops on teeth. Tartar is hardened plaque, and plaque is a mixture of saliva, bacteria and food particles. The bacteria feed on starch in the food particles, but there is no starch in raw meat, so the gums and teeth of animals on raw diets are healthier. Home-cooked starch-free likewise tend to bypass oral bacteria and reduce their numbers.
Gizzards amplify the benefits of raw and starch-free diets, since they require extensive chewing, which helps clean the teeth.  Raw bones also require chewing and work out the jaws and teeth. Some digestive tracts may be sensitive to raw bone fragments resulting in vomiting or diarrhea, although this is generally more true for cooked bones. Chewing on raw bones can sometimes also lead to slab fractures in a dog’s upper rear teeth, which may then need to be removed.

If your pet already has tartar or gum disease, consider  booking a teeth cleaning with us to restore them to health. Proper teeth cleaning requires geneal anesthesia, so if your pet is too ill for this procedures, here are some other things you can try:

  • Leba III and Biotene are products available from our clinic that enzymatically soften tartar from your pet’s teeth, allowing it to wear away while eating food or a bone.
  • Colloidal silver can be applied topically to kill the bacteria causing gingivitis or stomatitis, and has no side effects.
  • Wipe plaque from your pet’s teeth weekly with a gauze moistened with Biotene to prevent it from hardening into tartar.

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